Connect with us

Hi, what are you looking for?

Economy

From beef to chocolate, illegal deforestation found behind many everyday foods

BOGOTA  Nearly 70% of tropical forests cleared for cattle ranching and crops such as soybeans and palm oil were deforested illegally between 2013 and 2019, a study showed on Tuesday, warning of the impact on global efforts to fight climate change. 

Illegal logging was behind the loss of 4.5 million hectares of forest  an area the size of Denmark — on average each year in Latin America, Southeast Asia, and Africa, said the report by US-based nonprofit Forest Trends. 

“If we don’t urgently stop this unlawful deforestation, we don’t have a chance to beat the three crises facing humanity  climate change, biodiversity loss, and emerging pandemics,” said Arthur Blundell, report lead co-author and an advisor to Forest Trends, which works on economic tools to protect ecosystems. 

Palm oil cultivation in Indonesia, and soy and beef farming in Brazil  home to roughly 60% of the Amazon rainforest  were key drivers of illegal deforestation, the report said. 

The production of other agricultural commodities, such as cocoa used to make chocolate in Honduras and West Africa, and corn in Argentina, was also behind illegal forest clearance. 

In Indonesia, at least 81% of forested land cleared to produce palm oil is estimated to be illegal, the report said. 

In soy-producing countries, such as Brazil, about 93% of land converted to grow the crop used in cooking and for animal feed was illegal, while 93% of forest clearance for cocoa plantations was illegal and 81% for beef, the report said. 

The report defined illegal deforestation as forest clearance that broke national laws, such as loggers and companies failing to obtain permits from landowners or conduct environmental impact assessments, as well as cases involving tax evasion. 

SUPPLY CHAIN RISKS
Environmentalists and some lawmakers in the United States, EU, and Britain are calling for legislation that would stop goods grown on illegally cleared lands from ending up on supermarket shelves. 

In the United States, Democratic Senator Brian Schatz of Hawaii and congressman Earl Blumenauer of Oregon have announced plans for a bill that would ban US imports of agricultural commodities produced on illegally deforested land. 

“I think most US consumers would strongly agree that it’s immoral, outdated, and preposterous that products sold on supermarket shelves can be traced back to illegally deforested land,” Mr. Blumenauer said in a statement. 

The approach is modeled on the Lacey Act of 2008 passed in the United States that banned the import of illegally trafficked wildlife, plants and timber, which he said had brought progress. 

Britain is planning to introduce similar legislation. 

Cutting down forests has major implications for global goals to curb climate change, as trees absorb about a third of the planet-warming carbon emissions produced worldwide. 

Carbon emitted from illegal forest clearing for agriculture accounted for at least 41% of all emissions from tropical deforestation from 2013 and 2019, the report said. 

Efforts should also be stepped up to work with soy farmers and cattle ranchers to adopt a moratorium on forest clearing. 

“Illegal deforestation is a key driver of forest loss and creates significant risk for supply chain companies and financial institutions that may unwittingly supply or finance illegally sourced commodities,” said Justin Adams, executive director of the Tropical Forest Alliance, which works to rid supply chains of deforestation links.  Anastasia Moloney/Thomson Reuters Foundation 

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Get the daily email that makes reading the news actually enjoyable. Stay informed and entertained, for free.
Your information is secure and your privacy is protected. By opting in you agree to receive emails from us. Remember that you can opt-out any time, we hate spam too!

Latest

Investing

A cabinet split is hampering the government’s efforts to deal with the nationwide shortage of lorry drivers that threatens fuel supplies at some petrol...

Investing

Pubgoers are flocking back to their locals, according to figures that drew a cautious toast from the industry but also prompted warnings of fresh...

Investing

Ministers are backing a multibillion-pound plan to build another large-scale nuclear power plant in Britain to ease pressure on electricity supplies as the country...

Economy

The Philippines’ balance of payment position (BoP) hit $1.044 billion in August, the highest in four months, due to increased special drawing rights (SDR)...

Economy

Consumers were less pessimistic in the third quarter as more jobs opened up, but business sentiment turned sour amid a fresh surge in coronavirus...

Economy

The Philippine central bank fully awarded the short-term securities it sold at an auction on Friday, even as rates rose on growing inflation fears....

You May Also Like

Investing

Having a good Instagram marketing agency to back up your Instagram account is an absolute must going into the new year. With competition stronger...

Economy

Ivermectin, an existing drug against parasites including head lice, has had a checkered history when it comes to treating COVID-19. The bulk of studies...

Investing

As a traditionally rigid insurance industry becomes bogged down by antiquated processes and operations, a handful of industry leaders are seeking to shake things...

Economy

US President Joseph R. Biden, Jr., will rely on ally countries to supply the bulk of the metals needed to build electric vehicles and focus on...

Disclaimer: SmartRetirementReport.com, its managers, its employees, and assigns (collectively "The Company") do not make any guarantee or warranty about what is advertised above. Information provided by this website is for research purposes only and should not be considered as personalized financial advice. The Company is not affiliated with, nor does it receive compensation from, any specific security. The Company is not registered or licensed by any governing body in any jurisdiction to give investing advice or provide investment recommendation. Any investments recommended here should be taken into consideration only after consulting with your investment advisor and after reviewing the prospectus or financial statements of the company.

Copyright © 2021 SmartRetirementReport. All Rights Reserved.

Get the daily email that makes reading the news actually enjoyable. Stay informed and entertained, for free.



Your information is secure and your privacy is protected. By opting in you agree to receive emails from us. Remember that you can opt-out any time, we hate spam too!